Assisted Living in Mobile Alabama

Ashbury Manor Memory & Specialty Care is a 16 bed, state licensed community, locally owned caring for residents diagnosed with Alzheimer's and other cognitive deficits. Ashbury Manor is designed for the safety and security of each resident.

About Cindy Johnson

Ashbury Manor’s Administrator since 2008, Cindy Johnson is a long-time expert in the assisted living field. Prior to her arrival at Ashbury Manor, Cindy managed acquisitions and crisis management for existing and new larger senior care project developments for eleven years. As regional manager for an Oregon-based assisted living management company, Cindy was directly responsible for operations for five 50-65 bed assisted living facilities. As manager during the transition to new ownership, Cindy reorganized internal operations and conducted leadership training for Executive Directors. As a result of her management and expertise, one of the company’s facilities (in Ocala, Florida) received a deficiency-free survey, resulting in the lifting of a moratorium on operation.

A nurse for 36 years, senior care has always been Cindy’s passion. Desiring to work more closely with residents, Cindy became a Category II Administrator in 2005. As Ashbury Manor’s Administrator, Cindy understands the complexities associated with dementia and cognitive impairment and she has fallen in love with seniors with dementia or cognitive impairment and their families.

Cindy is Treasurer of the local “Senior Coalition” chapter. She enjoys mentoring new candidates who want to become administrators.

As a 16-bed facility, with Cindy's training and experience, our residents and their families can be sure Ashbury Manor’s carefully selected staff provides the expertise of a larger facility while maintaining the individualized personal care of a small special needs home.
Google Verified Author

3 Tips That Will Help You Choose the Ideal Assisted Living Facility for Mom

You understand that assisted living is one of the best options for aging seniors.

Yes, Moving an Aging Parent into Assisted Living CAN Provide a Great FOUNDATION for Wellness

Stress can affect people of all ages and can increase the risk of a wide range of health issues, including heart attacks, strokes, anxiety disorders, and much more.

Understand Expectations of an Assisted Living Facility as It Pertains to Pets BEFORE Committing to a Move

The more you learn about expectations and requirements for pets at assisted living, the easier it will be for the senior to make the right decision

Mom May Be Crying After Moving into an Assisted Living Community, but Adjustment Does Take Time

The more positive and supportive you are, the easier it’s going to be for her to make this transition and become comfortable there.

No, Mom and Dad Don’t Need to Live Separately When One Requires Assisted Living Support

It’s a personal choice that is dependent on one’s financial position in life, but there is no hard and fast rule that just because one parent requires assisted living the other has to say goodbye and remain where they were.

How Can a Person Know When It’s Time to Talk About Assisted Living with Someone They Love?

If this elderly person has friends who have already chosen assisted living and are enjoying life, this is a great launching point to begin talking about it with them.

Following Your Head Makes Better Decisions About Assisted Living, but Sometimes Your Heart Gets in the Way

You know, analytically speaking, your elderly mother would be better served at assisted living.

While Mom Might Certainly Benefit from Assisted Living, Dad’s Not Ready for That Move

Trying to convince aging parents that assisted living is a great option to consider can often feel like trying to herd cats.

Helping an Aging Senior Plan for a Move Is Made Easier with These Four Steps

Family and friends may rally around this senior to help them with this move, but there are a few things to keep in mind that can make this transition a bit easier or, at the very least, less fraught with unanswered questions or mistakes.

Three Common Excuses Some Seniors May Use to Refuse Assisted Living (and Why Knowing These May Help)

If you don’t want to do something, what is (generally) your response? You refuse, right? An aging senior might have difficulty taking care of their house, are constantly calling family and friends for assistance with a variety of tasks, and the topic of assisted living may come up.